2017

Welcome to 2017. This Date in Seal Beach History will be a mix of recycled past posts with original posts for dates that the blog hasn’t covered yet. If you see material you’ve seen before, please be patient. I’ll be posting some new Seal Beach history and photos throughout the year. With luck, we’ll finish 2017 with a post for each date in Seal Beach history. Thanks. – mpd

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February 26th in Seal Beach History

On this date in 1976, the Long Independent Press-Telegram ran the following ad for the Tiny Naylors restaurant in the Seal Beach Shopping Center, featuring a STEAK BONANZA” of daily steak specials.

Tiny Naylors (also once known as the Wooden Shoe) was demolished a few years ago, so you’ll have to look elsewhere for “”A Mighty Meat at a Mini Price.”

feb_26_1976_tiny_naylors_ad

– Michael Dobkins

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February 25th in Seal Beach History

On this date in 1948, a Oregon newspaper, the Corvallis Gazette-Times, ran the following ad for Dow Chemical.

It doesn’t really grant much opportunity for nostalgia, but Dow Chemical had a plant along the San Gabriel River from 1940 well into the 1960s. There are no postcards or historical markers, but for about a fourth of the 20th Century, Seal Beach was known to some of the country only as one of the places where they made Esteron 44 and Eastern Dust for weed control.

feb_25_48_dow_chemical_ad

– Michael Dobkins

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February 24th in Seal Beach History

Los Angeles Wine Society

On this date in 1857, the Los Angeles Vineyard Society was formed and held its first recorded meeting in San Francisco.  The society was comprised of German immigrants from a variety of professions interested in establishing a grape-growing cooperative in Southern California to serve the lucrative and expanding market for California wines. 

Seven months later the society purchased land twenty-seven miles southeast of Los Angeles and called their colony Anaheim.  In October 1864, Anaheim set up its own part twelve miles away in Alamitos Bay and named it Anaheim Landing. The landing was moved to its present location in what is now known as Anaheim Bay after silt from a massive flood made the original location impractical.

Anaheim Landing was a successful port for years before the railroad provided faster and more efficient shipping. Before Anaheim Landing’s glory days as a busy port faded, thousands of local people had experienced the pleasures of its beachside location — especially as an alternative to spending hot summers inland. This lead to Anaheim Landing’s second life as a vacation spot, the establishment of Bay City in land adjacent to Anaheim Bay, and ultimately the entire area becoming Seal Beach. 

– Michael Dobkins

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February 23rd in Seal Beach History

On this date in 1938, two Seal Beach women were saved from gas asphyxiation by their friend, Mary Eckberg. Elizabeth White, 79, and her cousin, Mary Hide, were overcome by gas fumes at Mrs. White’s house at 225 17th Street. Mrs. Eckberg has observed the two women earlier apparently taking a nap and choose not to disturb them. Luckily, she returned later and, observing her friends in exactly the same positions as earlier, Mrs. Eckberg contacted the police. Mrs. Hide was well enough to recover at home, but Mrs. White stayed overnight at Community Hospital.

– Michael Dobkins

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February 22nd In Seal Beach History

On this date in 1969, the Long Beach Independent Press-Telegram carried an ad that boldly announced the grand opening of a new model in the College Park tract.

The ad copy pointed out all the expensive luxury features of the new model and then shared that “the price remains remarkably low.” Nearly five decades later, $31,290 as a starting price is now impossibly low for a home in Seal Beach, but the price of feeling nostalgic over vintage Seal Beach real estate ads always remains remarkably… free.

february_23_1969_college_park_re_ad

 

– Michael Dobkins

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February 21st In Seal Beach History

On this date in 1964, Seal Beach Police issued a warrant charging 33-year old Frank Silone with two counts of grand theft-felony.

Silone and his 25-year old wife, Joan, managed Larsen Hall, a Long Beach State College approved off-campus coed dormitory located in a Seal Beach apartment building located at 1310 Electric Avenue. Thirteen students had registered there for the spring 1964 semester.

feb_21_1964_dorm_manager_flees_with_rent

Three coeds without a dorm – Sherrie Lauerman, 18, of Whittier (left), Joell Woods, 20, of Redlands, and Jerri Perez, 17, leaning on her suitcase

Unfortunately, no background check had been required for Silone, and he was approved as dorm manager after a personal interview and being vouched for by the previous owners of Larsen Hall and Silone’s father-in-law, a USC professor (Go Trojans!). This is sad for the thirteen students, since Silone had served a prison sentence from 1960 to 1963 and had even escaped from Chino Minimum Security Prison before being recaptured and sent o San Quentin. Perhaps not the best candidate for a coed dormitory manager.

Silone was charged with “misapplying in excess of $200” in funds received from two girls for room rent. He and his wife had skipped town shortly after February 17, the electricity had been turned off by the Edison Co., and the student manager of the hall had to convince the bank to cash a check so food could be bought for the hall.

Frank Bowman, the Long Beach State College housing coordinator, quickly removed Larsen Hall from the list of approved housing and wrote a letter to the parents of the Larsen Hall coeds informing them that their offspring would need to move to approved housing. The college would aid students without rent money, Bowman assured.

– Michael Dobkins

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February 20th In Seal Beach History

You can see the tracks from the spur line into the LA Gas & Electric property in the bottom left of this photo.

You can see the tracks from the spur line into the LA Gas & Electric property in the bottom left of this photo.

On this date in 1924, The Santa Ana Register announced that work was to begin within two weeks to build a spur line for delivery of materials into the Los Angeles Gas and Electric property where the power plant was being constructed. The spur line connected to the Pacific Electric tracks that ran into Seal Beach from the Long Beach peninsula along Ocean Avenue. These tracks could still be seen at First Street for years after the power plant was demolished in 1967.

– Michael Dobkins

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