March 26th in Seal Beach History

On this date in 1968, job seekers interested in local law enforcement careers probably circled this ad in the classified section of the Long Beach Independent:

March_26_1968_Police_Officers_Personnel-3

Adjusting for forty-seven years of inflation, a $592 monthly salary in 1968 is roughly the equivalent of $4,100 in 2015.

- Marilyn Van Dyke and Michael Dobkins

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March 25th in Seal Beach History

On this date in 1937, Dr. W. W. Chandler, chief inspector of the Orange County Health Department, imposed a ninety day quarantine on Seal Beach dogs in response to three diagnosed cases of rabies. Police Chief Lee Howard instituted a door-to-door canvass to notify residents that their pets should be confined during the quarantine.

When the quarantine was launched, eight people had been bitten by dogs diagnosed as rabid. The bite victims, John Burkhart, John Rainey, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Kobernik and their two children, Eldridge and Carolyn, Mrs. Gladys Curtis and Bill Lucas were  instructed to take Pasteur treatments. 

The three rabid dogs belonged to families living on Main Street. One, a small black dog was suspected of attacking other dogs before being captured and put down. The second rabid dog, a mother with a litter, had been killed when she ran amok several weeks before the quarantine. The third dog, a small white-haired pup from her litter, was still at large.

- Marilyn Van Dyke and Michael Dobkins

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March 24th in Seal Beach History

On this date in 1949, the solution to a small week-old Long Beach mystery was revealed residing in Seal Beach.

Worthmore Millinery in Long Beach once ran a regular weekly promotional ad campaign in the Long Beach Independent. The hat shop would snap a photograph with a hidden camera of an unsuspecting window shopper outside the store, and then the photo would be featured in a Thursday newspaper advertisement like this one from March 17th, 1949.

March_17_Worthmore_Hats_Mystery_WomanOn March 24th, the identity of the mystery photo woman from March 17th was revealed to be Mrs. G. A. Wise of 117 8th Street, Seal Beach!

March_24_1949_Mystery_SB_Woman_revealed-3Today the Long Beach Transit Mall stands in the center of the street behind Mrs. Wise, and thousands of passengers used it daily to board the Long Beach Blue Line train. The building behind her, the building with the Worthmore Millinery storefront and the hidden camera, the Seal Beach house where she lived, and presumably Mrs. Wise herself are all gone. The whereabouts of the free ten-dollar hat she won remains unknown.

- Marilyn Van Dyke and Michael Dobkins

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This Date in Seal Beach History Update

Due to illness and a death in the family, This Date In Seal Beach History has been on hiatus. Daily posts will resume on 3/24, and the backlog of missed dates will be posted in the weeks to come. Thank you for your interest and patience over the past month.

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February 24th in Seal Beach History

Los Angeles Wine Society

On this date in 1857, the Los Angeles Vineyard Society was formed and held its first recorded meeting in San Francisco.  The society was comprised of German immigrants from a variety of professions interested in establishing a grape-growing cooperative in Southern California to serve the lucrative and expanding market for California wines. 

Seven months later the society purchased land twenty-seven miles southeast of Los Angeles and called their colony Anaheim.  In October 1864, Anaheim set up its own part twelve miles away in Alamitos Bay and named it Anaheim Landing. The landing was moved to its present location in what is now known as Anaheim Bay after silt from a massive flood made the original location impractical.

Anaheim Landing was a successful port for years before the railroad provided faster and more efficient shipping. Before Anaheim Landing’s glory days as a busy port faded, thousands of local people had experienced the pleasures of its beachside location — especially as an alternative to spending hot summers inland. This lead to Anaheim Landing’s second life as a vacation spot, the establishment of Bay City in land adjacent to Anaheim Bay, and ultimately the entire area becoming Seal Beach. 

- Marilyn Van Dyke and Michael Dobkins

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February 23rd in Seal Beach History

On this date in 1938, two Seal Beach women were saved from gas asphyxiation by their friend, Mary Eckberg. Elizabeth White, 79, and her cousin, Mary Hide, were overcome by gas fumes at Mrs. White’s house at 225 17th Street. Mrs. Eckberg has observed the two women earlier apparently taking a nap and choose not to disturb them. Luckily, she returned later and, observing her friends in exactly the same positions as earlier, Mrs. Eckberg contacted the police. Mrs. Hide was well enough to recover at home, but Mrs. White stayed overnight at Community Hospital.

- Marilyn Van Dyke and Michael Dobkins

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February 17th in Seal Beach History

On this date in 1938, the Seal Beach City Council discussed a petition from the Seal Beach Improvement Association asking the council to support efforts to build a new bridge over the entrance to Anaheim Bay. The petition requested that a telegram be sent to Congressman Harry Sheppard for help obtaining government funding for the proposal and that the city engineer work with county engineer to make a survey of the project. Ultimately, the council decided to send a wire to Congressman Sheppard in spite of City Attorney Burr Brown’s objections.

- Marilyn Van Dyke and Michael Dobkins

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