2017

Welcome to 2017. This Date in Seal Beach History will be a mix of recycled past posts with original posts for dates that the blog hasn’t covered yet. If you see material you’ve seen before, please be patient. I’ll be posting some new Seal Beach history and photos throughout the year. With luck, we’ll finish 2017 with a post for each date in Seal Beach history. Thanks. – mpd

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March 29th in Seal Beach History

On this date in 1975, the Long Beach Independent ran the following advertisement:

March_29_1974_Green_Pepper_Ad-3

 The newspaper had run a rave mini-review of the Green Pepper the day before, declaring “For a masterpiece tostada, try the deluxe model, $1.95 at the Green Pepper Mexican Restaurant, 209 Main St,, Seal Beach. It is for the ‘one who has much hunger,’ because it is a whopper with meat, beans, grated cheese, mounds of salad and house dressing topped with guacamole. The Green Pepper (closed Sundays) is owned by Henry Lucero and his bride, Betty. It is open for luncheon and dinner offering fresh, colorful Mexican combination dinners, from $2.60, fancy Mexican appetizers, luncheon combos from $1.40; Mexican omelettes, sandwiches, wine margaritas and Mexican beers.”

The Green Pepper and Hank Lucero are gone now, and Woody’s Diner now occupies the space where the Green Pepper once operated. But many longtime Seal Beachers still remember Hank Lucero, the Deluxe Tostada, and all the fine Mexican meals they enjoyed at the Green Pepper.

– Michael Dobkins

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March 28th in Seal Beach History

On this date in 1914, the Guy M. Rush Company ran the following ad announcing to the world that “Seal Beach Is Moving Along” in both the San Bernardino News and The Free Press. The city would incorporate officially as Seal Beach in October of the following year, but the Seal Beach name was already being ferociously pushed as a new real estate brand in the hopes that lots in “Seal Beach” would sell better than lots in the bland and generically named “Bay City.”

March_28_1914_Seal_Beach_is_Moving_ad-3

– Michael Dobkins

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March 27th in Seal Beach History

On this date in 1917, the Santa Ana Register took some swimwear instruction from Luella Rogers from Seal Beach. The article focused on women who put on brightly hued bath suits for a beach visit, but never actually went swimming. Apparently the Non-Bathing Bathing Girl was one of the great issues of 1917. Fuddy-duddies felt that women who had no intentions of entering the water should wear more conservative clothes while on the beach.

The latest, prettiest, stripped bathing costumes of 1917

The latest, prettiest, stripped bathing costumes of 1917

Miss Rogers disagreed. “Wouldn’t a woman look fine running around the beach wearing a street dress? You’ve seen them try it and you usually see them trip and fall or they take a few steps and then stop for breath. Sometimes I like to go in swimming. Then I wear a close fitting bathing suit. But when I want to romp on the beach and do not want to go into the surf, I wear my latest, prettiest, stripped bathing costume, and I have a good time on the sand in spite of what I know the ‘old hens’ with their long black skirts say about me.”

I think we all know which side won this fashion war.

On the lookout for old hens with their long black skirts

On the lookout for old hens with their long black skirts

– Michael Dobkins

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March 26th in Seal Beach History

On this date in 1968, job seekers interested in local law enforcement careers probably circled this ad in the classified section of the Long Beach Independent:

March_26_1968_Police_Officers_Personnel-3

Adjusting for forty-seven years of inflation, a $592 monthly salary in 1968 is roughly the equivalent of $4,100 in 2015.

– Michael Dobkins

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March 25th in Seal Beach History

On this date in 1937, Dr. W. W. Chandler, chief inspector of the Orange County Health Department, imposed a ninety day quarantine on Seal Beach dogs in response to three diagnosed cases of rabies. Police Chief Lee Howard instituted a door-to-door canvass to notify residents that their pets should be confined during the quarantine.

When the quarantine was launched, eight people had been bitten by dogs diagnosed as rabid. The bite victims, John Burkhart, John Rainey, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Kobernik and their two children, Eldridge and Carolyn, Mrs. Gladys Curtis and Bill Lucas were  instructed to take Pasteur treatments. 

The three rabid dogs belonged to families living on Main Street. One, a small black dog was suspected of attacking other dogs before being captured and put down. The second rabid dog, a mother with a litter, had been killed when she ran amok several weeks before the quarantine. The third dog, a small white-haired pup from her litter, was still at large.

– Michael Dobkins

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March 24th in Seal Beach History

On this date in 1949, the solution to a small week-old Long Beach mystery was revealed residing in Seal Beach.

Worthmore Millinery in Long Beach once ran a regular weekly promotional ad campaign in the Long Beach Independent. The hat shop would snap a photograph with a hidden camera of an unsuspecting window shopper outside the store, and then the photo would be featured in a Thursday newspaper advertisement like this one from March 17th, 1949.

March_17_Worthmore_Hats_Mystery_WomanOn March 24th, the identity of the mystery photo woman from March 17th was revealed to be Mrs. G. A. Wise of 117 8th Street, Seal Beach!

March_24_1949_Mystery_SB_Woman_revealed-3Today the Long Beach Transit Mall stands in the center of the street behind Mrs. Wise, and thousands of passengers used it daily to board the Long Beach Blue Line train. The building behind her, the building with the Worthmore Millinery storefront and the hidden camera, the Seal Beach house where she lived, and presumably Mrs. Wise herself are all gone. The whereabouts of the free ten-dollar hat she won remains unknown.

– Michael Dobkins

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March 2nd in Seal Beach History

On this date in 1939, the Santa Ana Register reported that work on the new $110,000 pier was advancing.

According to a report made by Leon C. Michailes, a Public Works Administration engineer to Kenneth A. Godwin, the regional director for the PWA, 32 tons of reinforcing steel, 530 barrels of cement, 19,000 lineal feet of piling, and 360,000 board feet of lumber had been used to date in the pier construction.

The PWA had issued a grant for $49,090 towards the construction. The rest of the cost would be met locally.

– Michael Dobkins

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